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June Squibb, Tim Conway, and Billy Dee Williams are in the episode of Glee I wrote!!!
It’s a production of “Peter Pan” you’ll never forget! #OldDogsNewTricks

June Squibb, Tim Conway, and Billy Dee Williams are in the episode of Glee I wrote!!!

It’s a production of “Peter Pan” you’ll never forget!

buzzfeed:

queen-of-evrything:

jamieaiken919:

mister-smalls:

kingcheddarxvii:

This is the most perfect video on the whole fricked up internet and we all owe it to ourselves to watch it once a day

cutest thing to ever happen on the Muppet Show, bar none

I’m not crying you’re crying

SHUT UP

This just made my day

Hump Day stress reliever

He does like screwing with us

He does like screwing with us

Glee Recap 5.17 – The Love Bubble

Rachel tells the gang that she’d rather just be with them until the NYT review is released the next morning. They have just the place. Blaine, Kurt and the rest of the frailly take Rachel to a place that could only exist in New York. A musical theater leather bar. As soon as Rachel walks in, she is recognized by adoring fans. They beg her to sing, and she’s in absolute heaven. She struts around the bar, signing people’s body parts and singing “Pumping Blood” by the NoNoNo. It’s a full on dance party! Wave your hands in the air everyone!

Glee Recap 5.17 – The Love Bubble

Rachel tells the gang that she’d rather just be with them until the NYT review is released the next morning. They have just the place. Blaine, Kurt and the rest of the frailly take Rachel to a place that could only exist in New York. A musical theater leather bar. As soon as Rachel walks in, she is recognized by adoring fans. They beg her to sing, and she’s in absolute heaven. She struts around the bar, signing people’s body parts and singing “Pumping Blood” by the NoNoNo. It’s a full on dance party! Wave your hands in the air everyone!

ACTORS & SHIPPING

eaddymays:

Thoughts?

logotv:

Oh la la. Things between Stephane and Hugh are starting to get real (and hot!). Watch the latest episode of #MontrealBoy now!

And follow our friends over at Queer MTL while you’re at it!

Totally agreed with your Faking It post. All the people freaking out about misrepresentation are jumping to way too many conclusions. I feel like if they just watched the first episode they would realize that. AND Amy and Karma are totes adorable and I love them both!

mtv:

littleoases:

Yep. Don’t judge a book by its cover…or a show by its premise. 

And yes, they are such cuties. Rita Volk, omg. 

<3

I wonder if this may be a case where the title/tag line ends up being regretted in later seasons, like Cougar Town

(Source: alphalewolf)

shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..
As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:




As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes. 
The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one. 
The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 




I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 
Image via ACT UP.

shananaomi:

The Denver Principles were written in 1983 by the People with AIDS caucus—11 gay men with AIDS from around the country—during the fifth annual Gay and Lesbian Health Conference, held that year in Denver..

As my friend Sean Strub recounts in his excellent memoir, Body Counts:

As the conference was wrapping up, the eleven manifesto co-authors stormed the plenary stage behind a banner that read “Fighting for Our Lives.” They took the microphone and read the manifesto to a stone-silent convention hall. According to media reports at the time, at the end of the presentation, “there wasn’t a dry eye in the house,” and the audience gave them a standing ovation that lasted nearly fifteen minutes.

The concepts expressed in the Denver Principles manifesto weren’t new—to a large extent, they were an embodiment of feminist health principles—but it was radical for a group of people who shared a disease to organize politically to assert their right to a voice in the public-policy decision-making that would so profoundly affect their lives. Never in the history of humanity had this occurred; for people with AIDS, the Denver Principles document is the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Magna Carta all rolled into one.

The Denver Principles defined the philosophical underpinnings of the self-empowerment movement for the AIDS epidemic and the network of service providers we created. It also quickly became a model for organizing by those with other chronic health conditions in the U.S. and around the world. 

I am truly excited to see The Normal Heart get all the publicity in the world, including Matt Bomer also appearing on the cover of Details this month. But some of the language used in their piece is offensive, outdated and insulting. At best, I’d guess it’s a badly executed attempt at clever wordplay, but it still reminded me that I really want to post some additional historical context for the early AIDS epidemic here, too. 

Image via ACT UP.